Spare us from load shedding – Kariba residents

By Nhau Mangirazi

Residents in Zimbabwe’s northern resort town of Kariba are pushing  for reprieve from the current national blackouts as the country battles with electricity shortages.

The residents tabled their concerns with the Parliament Portfolio Committee on Energy claiming the town only uses 7 megawatts of power yet it is the sole generator of hydro-power and should therefore benefit from this source of energy without restrictions.

This followed a  recent visit by the Committee to assess the water levels in one of the country’s major sources of  hydro-electric power, Kariba dam, shared with Zambia under the Zambezi River Authority water project.

Sam Mawawo, executive chairperson of Kariba Incorporated Area Residents Ratepayers Association (KIARRA), was among the delegation that met the Portfolio Committee on Energy chaired by Joe Gabbuza MP for Binga. 

Mawawo said:  “We as Kariba residents …  are concerned that we are being affected by national load-shedding yet we generate electricity for the whole country. I am happy that my presentation to the parliament committee was well received.”  

The Committee, he said, promised that they would take the issue to the responsible Minister.  The residents urged the authorities to spare the town from the nationwide load sheddings as the resort town does not have any heavy industries.

Mawawo added: “Kariba generates over 300 megawatts and what we use is just but a drop in an ocean, hence our appeal to be spared the massive load-sheddings affecting the country.”

Another resident Rodrick Manyepa said their call is justified as they hardly have industries that use  a lot of electricity.

‘We are enduring more of power cuts going for over 16 hours yet we are living with wild animals and it’s a security risk for us here. We hope parliament will take our concerns as a matter of urgency,” said  Manyepa.

Ironically, local workers with the Zimbabwe Power Company who generate the electricity, are living in darkness besides working hard to generate energy for other towns.

“Logically, it does not make sense that the workers are living in darkness yet they generate electricity for the entire country,” added Mawawo.

   Although the parliamentary committee did not commit itself to anything, they sympathised with Kariba residents over the power crisis the country is facing.

However, Energy and Power Development Minister Advocate Fortune Chasi recently appealed to citizens as well as corporates to play a critical role in alleviating the power crisis gripping the nation.

 Chasi said the crisis is now a “huge problem”.

Zimbabwe is grappling with crippling power cuts as some areas are going for more than 16 hours a day without electricity, affecting industrial operations.

Chasi made these recommendations in a speech read on his behalf by his deputy minister Magna Mudyiwa at the Mine Entra conference in Zimbabwe second city of Bulawayo recently.

He said the country was in a ‘dire situation that needed a collective approach’ as government was unable to provide solutions on its own.

“We are in a dire situation as a country and as I keep saying, it has graduated from being a challenge to being a huge problem. The way forward is for all of us to share the pain and play an active role in alleviating this problem we all face collectively,” Chasi said then.

“Gone are the days where government used to provide all solutions; we now call for citizens and corporates to take an active participation in all issues to do with the economy,” he added.

Chasi confirmed that he met various captains of industry at gatherings and conferences in order to make an impassionate plea for people to honour their debts and taking responsibility of the situation the country finds itself in.

“We have all been irresponsible in our role as electricity consumers and as such, we have lost the moral high ground to criticise Zesa or my ministry for the load-shedding we are currently experiencing,” he said.

Residents in Zimbabwe’s northern resort town of Kariba are pushing  for reprieve from the current national blackouts as the country battles with electricity shortages.

The residents tabled their concerns with the Parliament Portfolio Committee on Energy claiming the town only uses 7 megawatts of power yet it is the sole generator of hydro-power and should therefore benefit from this source of energy without restrictions.

This followed a  recent visit by the Committee to assess the water levels in one of the country’s major sources of  hydro-electric power, Kariba dam, shared with Zambia under the Zambezi River Authority water project.

Sam Mawawo, executive chairperson of Kariba Incorporated Area Residents Ratepayers Association (KIARRA), was among the delegation that met the Portfolio Committee on Energy chaired by Joe Gabbuza MP for Binga. 

Mawawo said:  “We as Kariba residents …  are concerned that we are being affected by national load-shedding yet we generate electricity for the whole country. I am happy that my presentation to the parliament committee was well received.”  

The Committee, he said, promised that they would take the issue to the responsible Minister.  The residents urged the authorities to spare the town from the nationwide load sheddings as the resort town does not have any heavy industries.

Mawawo added: “Kariba generates over 300 megawatts and what we use is just but a drop in an ocean, hence our appeal to be spared the massive load-sheddings affecting the country.”

Another resident Rodrick Manyepa said their call is justified as they hardly have industries that use  a lot of electricity.

‘We are enduring more of power cuts going for over 16 hours yet we are living with wild animals and it’s a security risk for us here. We hope parliament will take our concerns as a matter of urgency,” said  Manyepa.

Ironically, local workers with the Zimbabwe Power Company who generate the electricity, are living in darkness besides working hard to generate energy for other towns.

“Logically, it does not make sense that the workers are living in darkness yet they generate electricity for the entire country,” added Mawawo.

   Although the parliamentary committee did not commit itself to anything, they sympathised with Kariba residents over the power crisis the country is facing.

However, Energy and Power Development Minister Advocate Fortune Chasi recently appealed to citizens as well as corporates to play a critical role in alleviating the power crisis gripping the nation.

 Chasi said the crisis is now a “huge problem”.

Zimbabwe is grappling with crippling power cuts as some areas are going for more than 16 hours a day without electricity, affecting industrial operations.

Chasi made these recommendations in a speech read on his behalf by his deputy minister Magna Mudyiwa at the Mine Entra conference in Zimbabwe second city of Bulawayo recently.

He said the country was in a ‘dire situation that needed a collective approach’ as government was unable to provide solutions on its own.

“We are in a dire situation as a country and as I keep saying, it has graduated from being a challenge to being a huge problem. The way forward is for all of us to share the pain and play an active role in alleviating this problem we all face collectively,” Chasi said then.

“Gone are the days where government used to provide all solutions; we now call for citizens and corporates to take an active participation in all issues to do with the economy,” he added.

Chasi confirmed that he met various captains of industry at gatherings and conferences in order to make an impassionate plea for people to honour their debts and taking responsibility of the situation the country finds itself in.

“We have all been irresponsible in our role as electricity consumers and as such, we have lost the moral high ground to criticise Zesa or my ministry for the load-shedding we are currently experiencing,” he said.

Residents in Zimbabwe’s northern resort town of Kariba are pushing  for reprieve from the current national blackouts as the country battles with electricity shortages.

The residents tabled their concerns with the Parliament Portfolio Committee on Energy claiming the town only uses 7 megawatts of power yet it is the sole generator of hydro-power and should therefore benefit from this source of energy without restrictions.

This followed a  recent visit by the Committee to assess the water levels in one of the country’s major sources of  hydro-electric power, Kariba dam, shared with Zambia under the Zambezi River Authority water project.

Sam Mawawo, executive chairperson of Kariba Incorporated Area Residents Ratepayers Association (KIARRA), was among the delegation that met the Portfolio Committee on Energy chaired by Joe Gabbuza MP for Binga. 

Mawawo said:  “We as Kariba residents …  are concerned that we are being affected by national load-shedding yet we generate electricity for the whole country. I am happy that my presentation to the parliament committee was well received.”  

The Committee, he said, promised that they would take the issue to the responsible Minister.  The residents urged the authorities to spare the town from the nationwide load sheddings as the resort town does not have any heavy industries.

Mawawo added: “Kariba generates over 300 megawatts and what we use is just but a drop in an ocean, hence our appeal to be spared the massive load-sheddings affecting the country.”

Another resident Rodrick Manyepa said their call is justified as they hardly have industries that use  a lot of electricity.

‘We are enduring more of power cuts going for over 16 hours yet we are living with wild animals and it’s a security risk for us here. We hope parliament will take our concerns as a matter of urgency,” said  Manyepa.

Ironically, local workers with the Zimbabwe Power Company who generate the electricity, are living in darkness besides working hard to generate energy for other towns.

“Logically, it does not make sense that the workers are living in darkness yet they generate electricity for the entire country,” added Mawawo.

   Although the parliamentary committee did not commit itself to anything, they sympathised with Kariba residents over the power crisis the country is facing.

However, Energy and Power Development Minister Advocate Fortune Chasi recently appealed to citizens as well as corporates to play a critical role in alleviating the power crisis gripping the nation.

 Chasi said the crisis is now a “huge problem”.

Zimbabwe is grappling with crippling power cuts as some areas are going for more than 16 hours a day without electricity, affecting industrial operations.

Chasi made these recommendations in a speech read on his behalf by his deputy minister Magna Mudyiwa at the Mine Entra conference in Zimbabwe second city of Bulawayo recently.

He said the country was in a ‘dire situation that needed a collective approach’ as government was unable to provide solutions on its own.

“We are in a dire situation as a country and as I keep saying, it has graduated from being a challenge to being a huge problem. The way forward is for all of us to share the pain and play an active role in alleviating this problem we all face collectively,” Chasi said then.

“Gone are the days where government used to provide all solutions; we now call for citizens and corporates to take an active participation in all issues to do with the economy,” he added.

Chasi confirmed that he met various captains of industry at gatherings and conferences in order to make an impassionate plea for people to honour their debts and taking responsibility of the situation the country finds itself in.

“We have all been irresponsible in our role as electricity consumers and as such, we have lost the moral high ground to criticise Zesa or my ministry for the load-shedding we are currently experiencing,” he said.Residents in Zimbabwe’s northern resort town of Kariba are pushing  for reprieve from the current national blackouts as the country battles with electricity shortages.

The residents tabled their concerns with the Parliament Portfolio Committee on Energy claiming the town only uses 7 megawatts of power yet it is the sole generator of hydro-power and should therefore benefit from this source of energy without restrictions.

This followed a  recent visit by the Committee to assess the water levels in one of the country’s major sources of  hydro-electric power, Kariba dam, shared with Zambia under the Zambezi River Authority water project.

Sam Mawawo, executive chairperson of Kariba Incorporated Area Residents Ratepayers Association (KIARRA), was among the delegation that met the Portfolio Committee on Energy chaired by Joe Gabbuza MP for Binga. 

Mawawo said:  “We as Kariba residents …  are concerned that we are being affected by national load-shedding yet we generate electricity for the whole country. I am happy that my presentation to the parliament committee was well received.”  

The Committee, he said, promised that they would take the issue to the responsible Minister.  The residents urged the authorities to spare the town from the nationwide load sheddings as the resort town does not have any heavy industries.

Mawawo added: “Kariba generates over 300 megawatts and what we use is just but a drop in an ocean, hence our appeal to be spared the massive load-sheddings affecting the country.”

Another resident Rodrick Manyepa said their call is justified as they hardly have industries that use  a lot of electricity.

‘We are enduring more of power cuts going for over 16 hours yet we are living with wild animals and it’s a security risk for us here. We hope parliament will take our concerns as a matter of urgency,” said  Manyepa.

Ironically, local workers with the Zimbabwe Power Company who generate the electricity, are living in darkness besides working hard to generate energy for other towns.

“Logically, it does not make sense that the workers are living in darkness yet they generate electricity for the entire country,” added Mawawo.

   Although the parliamentary committee did not commit itself to anything, they sympathised with Kariba residents over the power crisis the country is facing.

However, Energy and Power Development Minister Advocate Fortune Chasi recently appealed to citizens as well as corporates to play a critical role in alleviating the power crisis gripping the nation.

 Chasi said the crisis is now a “huge problem”.

Zimbabwe is grappling with crippling power cuts as some areas are going for more than 16 hours a day without electricity, affecting industrial operations.

Chasi made these recommendations in a speech read on his behalf by his deputy minister Magna Mudyiwa at the Mine Entra conference in Zimbabwe second city of Bulawayo recently.

He said the country was in a ‘dire situation that needed a collective approach’ as government was unable to provide solutions on its own.

“We are in a dire situation as a country and as I keep saying, it has graduated from being a challenge to being a huge problem. The way forward is for all of us to share the pain and play an active role in alleviating this problem we all face collectively,” Chasi said then.

“Gone are the days where government used to provide all solutions; we now call for citizens and corporates to take an active participation in all issues to do with the economy,” he added.

Chasi confirmed that he met various captains of industry at gatherings and conferences in order to make an impassionate plea for people to honour their debts and taking responsibility of the situation the country finds itself in.

“We have all been irresponsible in our role as electricity consumers and as such, we have lost the moral high ground to criticise Zesa or my ministry for the load-shedding we are currently experiencing,” he said.

 

Post Author: Chido Luciasi

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